Facebook

The CLOCK gene

The CLOCK gene

Rise & Shine!

……with the CLOCK gene

Circadian rhythms are physical, mental and behavioural changes that follow a roughly 24-hour cycle.  

The CLOCK gene affect circadian rhythms and contribute to a large degree whether you are a ‘morning person’ or ‘night owl’. 

Losing one night’s sleep will likely make you grumpy the next day, however, the body’s clock is responsible for more than just sleep and wakefulness.

A chronic disturbance in your circadian rhythm genes is (independant from sleep) associated with: 

  • a high body mass
  • depression and other mood disorders such as bi-polar disorder
  • type II diabetes
  • heart disorders
  • a compromised immunity

 

Keeping circadian rhythms in check is so important that there is a very distinct brain region dedicated just with keeping time:  the suprachiasmatic nucleus.  It is responding primarily to light and darkness in the environment. 

If you have a specific genetic CLOCK mutation, GENEWAY will provide you with several numerous actionable recommendations that can help to reset the circadian rhythms and reduce the risk for associated disorders.

Contact us today for more information.

 

Spread the love

Related Articles

Is Dementia Hereditary/Genetic?

Is Dementia Hereditary/Genetic?

It is said that about 55 million people worldwide have dementia. Dementia is a broad term used to describe a decline in cognitive function that affects an individual's daily life. It includes problems with memory, thinking, language, judgement, and behaviour....

read more
How To Balance Your Oestrogen Levels

How To Balance Your Oestrogen Levels

Too much oestrogen in the female body can lead to certain health conditions such as breast cancer, ovarian cysts, and endometriosis in predisposed individuals. On the other hand, low levels of oestrogen can cause menopausal symptoms such as hot flashes, mood swings,...

read more
What Is DIM (Diindolylmethane)? And How Does It Work

What Is DIM (Diindolylmethane)? And How Does It Work

A few years ago, according to the Denver Vein Center, researchers discovered that old broccoli sprouts could help reduce the risk of cancer. The active compound responsible for this protective effect was identified as Diindolylmethane, also known as DIM. Since then,...

read more
×

Hello!

Click on Customer Support to connect on WhatsApp or send us an email to info@geneway.health

× How can we help you?